Tech-invite3GPPspaceIETF RFCsSIP
Quick21222324252627282931323334353637384‑5x

Content for  TS 23.434  Word version:  18.0.0

Top   Top   Up   Prev   None
0…   4…   6…   6.4…   6.5…   7…   8…   8.2.2…   9…   9.3…   9.3.6…   9.4…   10…   10.3…   10.3.2.22…   10.3.3…   10.3.7…   10.4…   11…   11.3…   12…   13…   14…   14.3…   14.3.3…   14.3.3.3…   14.3.4…   14.3.4.6…   14.4…   15…   A…

 

A  SEAL integration with 3GPP network exposure systemsWord‑p. 181

Figure A-1 illustrates the service-based interface representation of the functional model for SEAL services integration with 5GC network exposure system.
Reproduction of 3GPP TS 23.434, Fig. A-1: SEAL integration with 5GC network exposure system
Up
The details of NEF and its role in exposing network capabilities of 5GS to 3rd party applications are specified in TS 23.501 and the details of NEF service operations are specified in TS 23.502.
Figure A-2 illustrates the service-based interface representation of the functional model for SEAL services integration with EPC network exposure system.
Reproduction of 3GPP TS 23.434, Fig. A-2: SEAL integration with EPC network exposure system
Up
The details of SCEF and its role in exposing network capabilities of EPS to 3rd party applications are specified in TS 23.682.

B  SEAL functional model mapping with Common functional architecture (CFA)Word‑p. 183

The Table B-1 shows the mapping between the SEAL functional model and the Common functional architecture (CFA). The details of CFA functional entities and reference points are specified in TS 23.280.
SEAL service Aspects SEAL CFA
Location managementFunctional entityLocation management clientLocation management client
Location management serverLocation management server
Reference pointsLM-UUCSC-14
LM-SCSC-15
LM-CNot defined
LM-ENot defined
LM-PC5Not defined
Group managementFunctional entityGroup management clientGroup management client
Group management serverGroup management server
Reference pointsGM-UUCSC-2
GM-SCSC-3
GM-CNot defined
GM-ECSC-16
GM-PC5CSC-12
Configuration managementFunctional entityConfiguration management clientConfiguration management client
Configuration management serverConfiguration management server
Reference pointsCM-UUCSC-4
CM-SCSC-5
CM-CNot defined
CM-ECSC-17
CM-PC5CSC-11
Identity managementFunctional entityIdentity management clientIdentity management client
Identity management serverIdentity management server
Reference pointsIM-UUCSC-1
IM-SNot defined
IM-CNot defined
IM-ENot defined
IM-PC5Not defined
Key managementFunctional entityKey management clientKey management client
Key management serverKey management server
Reference pointsKM-UUCSC-8
KM-SCSC-9
KM-PC5Not defined
Network resource managementFunctional entityNetwork resource management clientNot defined (see NOTE)
Network resource management serverNot defined (see NOTE)
Reference pointsNRM-UUNot defined (see NOTE)
NRM-SNot defined
NRM-CNot defined
NRM-ENot defined
NRM-PC5Not defined
NOTE:
Defined in the application layer for Mission Critical service (e.g. MCPTT).
Up

C (Normative)  Protocol realizations of LWP in the signalling control plane |R17|Word‑p. 184

C.1  GeneralWord‑p. 184

This Annex specifies protocol realizations of the light-weight protocol in the signalling control plane.

C.2  Usage of CoAP as LWPWord‑p. 184

This clause specifies how the CoAP protocol shall be used to realize the generic light-weight protocol in the signalling control plane.
The Constrained Application Protocol (CoAP) is a light-weight protocol defined by IETF in RFC 7252 and designed specifically for application layer communication for constrained devices. CoAP provides a request/response interaction model between application endpoints, supports built-in discovery of services and resources, and includes key concepts of the Web such as URIs and Internet media types. CoAP is designed to easily interface with HTTP for integration with the Web while meeting specialized requirements such as multicast support, very low overhead, and simplicity for constrained environments. RFC 7252 specifies bindings to UDP and DTLS. RFC 8323 specifies bindings to TCP, WebSocket and TLS.
Figure C.2-1 illustrates the functional model for the LWP signalling control plane when CoAP is used as the LWP.
Reproduction of 3GPP TS 23.434, Fig. C.2-1: Functional model for LWP signalling control plane when CoAP is used as LWP
Up
When CoAP is used to realize the generic light-weight protocol defined in clause 6.2, then,
Step 1.
CoAP client is a realization of the LWP client
Step 2.
CoAP proxy is a realization of the LWP proxy, with the following clarifications:
  1. CoAP proxy shall be able to terminate a DTLS, TLS or secure WebSocket session on LWP-1 reference point;
  2. CoAP proxy shall be able to act as a cross-protocol CoAP-HTTP proxy to support LWP-HTTP-2 and LWP-HTTP-3 reference points;
Step 3.
CoAP server is a realization of the LWP server
Step 4.
CoAP supports the interactions over LWP-1, LWP-2 and LWP-3 reference points
Step 5.
The usage of CoAP by the SEAL service enablers shall follow the rules set out in clause 6.4.3.5.
Up

$  Change historyWord‑p. 185


Up   Top