Tech-invite3GPPspecsSIPRFCs
Overview21222324252627282931323334353637384‑5x

Content for  TS 22.104  Word version:  17.3.0

Top   Top   None   None   Next
1…   4…   5…   5.3…   6…   7…   A…   A.2.3…   A.4…   A.5…   A.6…   B…   C…   C.3…   D…   E…

 

1  ScopeWord‑p. 7
The present document provides Stage 1 normative service requirements for 5G systems, in particular service requirements for cyber-physical control applications in vertical domains. In the context of the present document, cyber-physical systems are to be understood as systems that include engineered, interacting networks of physical and computational components; control applications are to be understood as applications that control physical processes.
Communication services supporting cyber-physical control applications need to be ultra-reliable and, in some cases, the end-to-end latency must be very low. Communication for cyber-physical control applications supports operation in various vertical domains, for instance industrial automation and energy automation.
The aspects addressed in the present document include:
  • end-to-end service performance requirements and network performance requirements related to these end-to-end service performance requirements;
  • support for LAN-type services specific to industrial/high performance use cases. Related Ethernet functionalities include, for example, those in IEEE 802.1Qbv.
Up
2  References
The following documents contain provisions which, through reference in this text, constitute provisions of the present document.
  • References are either specific (identified by date of publication, edition number, version number, etc.) or non-specific.
  • For a specific reference, subsequent revisions do not apply.
  • For a non-specific reference, the latest version applies. In the case of a reference to a 3GPP document (including a GSM document), a non-specific reference implicitly refers to the latest version of that document in the same Release as the present document.
[1]
TR 21.905   "Vocabulary for 3GPP Specifications".
[2]
TS 22.261   "Service requirements for the 5G system".
[3]
IEC 61784-3: "Industrial communication networks - profiles - part 3: functional fieldbuses - general rules and profile definitions".
[4]
BZKI, "Aspects of dependability assessment in ZDKI", June 2017.
[5]
BZKI, "Requirement Profiles in ZDKI", 2017.
[6]
IEC 61158: "Industrial communication networks - fieldbus specification", 2014.
[7]
IEC 61907, "Communication network dependability engineering".
[8]
Richard C. Dorf and Robert H. Bishop, "Modern Control Systems", Pearson, Harlow, 13th Edition, 2017.
[9]
Ernie Hayden, Michael Assante, and Tim Conway, "An Abbreviated History of Automation & Industrial Controls Systems and Cybersecurity", SANS Institute, https://ics.sans.org/media/An-Abbreviated-History-of-Automation-and-ICS-Cybersecurity.pdf {accessed: 2017-05-23}, 2014.
[10]
IEC 61512 "Batch control - Part 1: Models and terminology".
[11]
RESERVE project, Deliverable D1.3, ICT Requirements,
http://www.re-serve.eu/files/reserve/Content/Deliverables/D1.3.pdf, September 2017.
[12]
RESERVE project, Deliverable D1.2, Energy System Requirements
http://www.re-serve.eu/files/reserve/Content/Deliverables/D1.2.pdf, September 2017.
[13]
G. Garner, "Designing Last Mile Communications Infrastructures for Intelligent Utility Networks (Smart Grids)", IBM Australia Limited, 2010.
[14]
B. Al-Omar, B., A. R. Al-Ali, R. Ahmed, and T. Landolsi, "Role of Information and Communication Technologies in the Smart Grid", Journal of Emerging Trends in Computing and Information Sciences, Vol. 3, pp. 707-716, 2015.
[15]
H. Kagermann, W. Wahlster, and J. Helbig, "Recommendations for implementing the strategic initiative INDUSTRIE 4.0", Final report of the Industrie 4.0 working group, acatech - National Academy of Science and Engineering, Munich, April 2013.
[16]
IEC 62443-3-2: "Security for industrial automation and control systems - Part 3-2: Security risk assessment and system design", in progress.
[17]
IEC 62657-2: "Industrial communication networks - Wireless communication networks - Part 2: Coexistence management", 2017.
[18]
IEC 62657-1: "Industrial communication networks - Wireless communication networks - Part 1: Wireless communication requirements and spectrum considerations".
[19]
IEEE Std 802.1Q "Media Access Control (MAC) Bridges and Virtual Bridge Local Area Networks".
NOTE: IEEE Std 802.1Qbv-2015 "Enhancements for Scheduled Traffic" has been included into IEEE Std 802.1Q-2018.
[20]
IEEE, Use Cases IEC/IEEE 60802, 2018.
[21]
"IEEE Standard for Local and metropolitan area networks--Timing and Synchronization for Time-Sensitive Applications in Bridged Local Area Networks--Corrigendum 1: Technical and Editorial Corrections," IEEE Std 802.1AS-2011/Cor 1-2013 (Corrigendum to IEEE Std 802.1AS-2011), pp. 1-128, Sept 2013.
[22]
"IEEE Standard for Local and metropolitan area networks--Timing and Synchronization for Time-Sensitive Applications," IEEE Std 802.1AS-Rev/D7.3, pp. 1-502, August 2018.
[23]
TS 22.289   "Mobile Communication System for Railways".
[24]
IEEE P802.1CS: "IEEE Draft Standard for Local and metropolitan area networks - Link-local Registration Protocol"
[25]
IEEE P802.1Qdd: "IEEE Draft Standard for Local and Metropolitan Area Networks--Bridges and Bridged Networks -- Amendment: Resource Allocation Protocol (RAP)"
[26]
IEC/IEEE 60802: "Time-Sensitive Networking Profile for Industrial Automation".
[27]
TS 22.263   "Service requirements for Video, Imaging and Audio for Professional Applications (VIAPA)".
Up
3  Definitions, symbols and abbreviationsWord‑p. 8
3.1  Definitions
For the purposes of the present document, the terms and definitions given in TR 21.905 and the following apply. A term defined in the present document takes precedence over the definition of the same term, if any, in TR 21.905.
characteristic parameter:
numerical value that can be used for characterising the dynamic behaviour of communication functionality from an application point of view.
clock synchronicity:
the maximum allowed time offset within a synchronisation domain between the sync master and any sync device.
clock synchronisation service:
the service to align otherwise independent user-specific UE clocks.
communication service availability:
percentage value of the amount of time the end-to-end communication service is delivered according to an agreed QoS, divided by the amount of time the system is expected to deliver the end-to-end service according to the specification in a specific area.
communication service reliability:
ability of the communication service to perform as required for a given time interval, under given conditions.
end-to-end latency:
the time that takes to transfer a given piece of information from a source to a destination, measured at the communication interface, from the moment it is transmitted by the source to the moment it is successfully received at the destination.
    error:
    discrepancy between a computed, observed or measured value or condition and the true, specified or theoretically correct value or condition.
factory automation:
automation application in industrial automation branches typically with discrete characteristics of the application to be automated with specific requirements for determinism, low latency, reliability, redundancy, cyber security, and functional safety.
global clock:
a user-specific synchronization clock set to a reference timescale such as the International Atomic Time.
influence quantity:
quantity not essential for the performance of an item but affecting its performance.
process automation:
automation application in industrial automation branches typically with continuous characteristics of the application to be automated with specific requirements for determinism, reliability, redundancy, cyber security, and functional safety.
service area:
geographic region where a 3GPP communication service is accessible.
survival time:
the time that an application consuming a communication service may continue without an anticipated message.
sync device:
device that synchronizes itself to the master clock of the synchronization domain.
sync master:
device serving as the master clock of the synchronization domain.
transfer interval:
time difference between two consecutive transfers of application data from an application via the service interface to 3GPP system.
user experienced data rate:
the minimum data rate required to achieve a sufficient quality experience, with the exception of scenario for broadcast like services where the given value is the maximum that is needed.
vertical domain:
an industry or group of enterprises in which similar products or services are developed, produced, and provided.
working clock:
a user-specific synchronization clock for a localized set of UEs collaborating on a specific task or work function.
Up
3.2  SymbolsWord‑p. 10
For the purposes of the present document, the following symbols apply:
<symbol> <Explanation>
3.3  Abbreviations
For the purposes of the present document, the abbreviations given in TR 21.905 and the following apply. An abbreviation defined in the present document takes precedence over the definition of the same abbreviation, if any, in TR 21.905.
CSIF
Communication Service Interface
EPON
Ethernet Passive Optical Network
FIFO
First In, First Out
GOOSE
Generic Object-Oriented Substation Event
HCL
Higher Communication Layer
HMI
Human Machine Interface
IMU
Inertial Measurement Unit
LCL
Lower Communication Layer
PMU
Phasor Measurement Unit
Up

Up   Top   ToC