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Content for  TS 22.259  Word version:  16.0.0

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A  Use casesWord‑p. 17

A.1  Use case: Connection between PNEs of a PN

PNM allows the communication between a PNE and PNEs of other UEs/PANs belonging to the same PN. For this purpose it shall be possible to establish a secure link between the PNEs of a PN. This is enabled by establishing secure links among locally connected devices of a PAN. In the example in figure 4 the PNEs have established a secure link. Through this secure link, a user is able to gain access from the ME in UE1 to the TE in UE2 at home and monitor the heating or burglar alarm system while away from home, therefore enabling the ME to be the active PNE for termination of the alarm service remotely. Figure 5 explains the secure PNE-PNE communications.
The TE in UE2 has an own PNE Identifier that allows the ME in UE1 to identify and to directly communicate with the TE.
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Figure 4: Use case for connection between the devices of a PN
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Figure 5: Connection between the PNEs
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A.2  Use case of UE-PN connectionWord‑p. 18
Personal UE Networks security requirements state that registration of a PNE to a PN requires the consent of the owner of the USIM associated with the PLMN. The description here concerns access of a Personal Network by a PNE external to that Personal Network. In the case of user A wishing to allow PNE B to register into his PN as a Guest UE, the user controls access to his PN, in other words PNM protects the privacy of A's PN. For example in figure 6, PNE B (ME) may only be allowed to access TE A1 and this is controlled by the user, and enabled by procedures. PNE B may access A's PN by appropriate means, e.g. an "invite function".
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Figure 6: Use case for UE-PN connection
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A.2a  PN Access control: Parental controlWord‑p. 19
Alice has subscribed to PNM private network service. She has two UEs with her in the PN - UE 1a and UE 1b. She decides to give UE 1b to her son Bob. Bob is still a young kid and Alice worries about him getting calls from strangers. So she registers her UE (UE 1a) as default UE for access control. She then creates an access list that contains a list of registered callers (Guest UEs). Any calls from the registered callers (e.g. UE 3) or Guests are allowed to go through to the private UE (Bob's UE) directly. In case of unregistered callers (e.g. UE 2), the PN AS rejects the call directly or the PN Server queries Alice (UE 1a) whether the call can be continued. Alice can respond by allowing or disallowing (cancelling) the call. In addition, she may register the unregistered caller dynamically (on the fly) during session initiation procedures itself.
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Figure 16: Use case for PN Access Control
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A.3  Use case of PN-User access a PLMN from their PNEs

Figure 7 shows a use case where a user terminates a video service with a PNEs, which is part of a PAN of the PN-User. In this use case the user has multiple PNEs. It is assumed that the required PNE can communicate with the PNE containing the USIM through PAN internal communication means when they are in close proximity. After authentication of the PNEs by the PLMN through the PNE holding the (U)SIM, the user can access the video service. The PNM has the capability to manage the UE components as a user's PAN. It shall have a binding table between the PNE holding the (U)SIMand the other PAN PNEs which includes their identities and addresses.\fig:tinv-22-259-ny#Figure 8 shows a use case where a user utilizes a video service through PNEs that have their own network access means and thus a direct access means to a PNM. PNEs attached to a UE don't have their own USIM and may or may not have their own access means. The PNE holding the (U)SIM can authenticate these other PNEs to the PLMN when these PNEsare in close proximity to the UE. After authentication of the PNEs, the user can access the video service directly via the attached PNEs, with no help from the PNE holding the (U)SIM. Again, the PNM of a PLMN has the capability to manage more than one PNE under a PAN. As long as the PNEs are connected to the PNE holding the U(SIM) it shall be possible to keep the data communication channels through established access network means of the MEs themselves. If an PNE disassociates from the PNE holding the U(SIM), the data communication channels of the PAN PNE should be terminated immediately.\fig:tinv-22-259-ny#Figure 9 shows a use case where a user receives a video service through PNEs which are directly connected to another access system (i.e, External IP network with a commercial relationship with the PNM service provider). When many packets (e.g. for a higher resolution or frame rate) are sent to a user for Video Service, the user may want to receive them directly through a more suitable PNE and access system. If the specific PNE has its own network connection, not via UE, the user can request the PNM to get a new data path via its own network connection e.g. Internet. In this case, the specific PNE must be authenticated and authorized by using the PNE holding the (USIM) (i.e., a single USIM authority is shared by all the PNEs of the PAN) and the session is controlled by UE. The user can receive the video service through the PNE after the PNM establishes a new data path via the external IP network for Video Service. If the user wants to disconnect the new data path, which is already connected to a PNE, he/she can also request the release of new data path through PNM. The new data path of the PNE will be terminated immediately.
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Figure 7: Single network connection through PNE holding the (U)SIM of PAN Figure 8: Multiple network connections through 3GPP access systems
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Figure 9: Multiple network connections through other access system
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A.4  Use case for connection between guest UE and PNWord‑p. 20
The Guest UE is registered into the PN after authentication mechanisms. This use case describes an example where the Guest UE belongs to a different service provider. Once registered into the PN, the Guest UE is allowed to access the PN, based on access control procedures set by the PN user for the particular Guest UE. For example, in fig 10 given below, the Guest UE is allowed to access the video service that the PN of the PNE holding the (U)SIM offers. That is the Guest UE is chosen for the termination of the specific service of video that the PN offers, The PNM facilitates this by secure authentication, registration and routing of the Guest UE.
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Figure 10: Guest UE registered in PN
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A.5  Use case on UE redirection of terminating servicesWord‑p. 21
A user owns two phones, a PDA, and a notebook. All devices have radio access means to the 3GPP System. Phones and PDA support UTRAN. The notebook allows access via WLAN. The user has subscribed the PNM PN UE redirection and registered all devices in the Personal Network.
In a possible scenario the user is on an airport and must wait for a delayed plane. The user carries the notebook and one of the phones with her/him. The other two devices are left at home. Usually the user does not use the notebook for accessing 3GPP services. However, an Interworked WLAN access network may exist at the airport. Via the WLAN hotspot the user is able to establish a connection to the PLMN. To shorten the waiting time the user wants to utilize the WLAN hotspot for enjoying subscribed 3GPP multimedia services via the notebook. The services are configured for the termination at PDA and phones. The user needs a convenient solution to enable a temporary termination of the services with the notebook in order to benefit from the available advanced multimedia processing capabilities of the notebook and the high speed data access. Depending on the services the user would have to reconfigure either the services or the devices. In case of device reconfiguration a forwarding function would have to be set up at the phones and the PDA for directing services to the notebook. This is not only inconvenient but currently not feasible for the user as a part of the devices is left at home. Furthermore different redirecting settings would be required for CS and IMS. In praxis the complicated manual handling would hamper the flexible use of the available devices. Instead the user wants to switch on the notebook and press a button to activate the notebook for the service termination either temporarily or permanently. Depending on the user preferences the user interface may also offer to activate a specific subscribed service, like a multimedia news service. Beside of the minimized manual interaction the handling would be more natural. When the user wants to do something with a particular device the user does not expect the necessity to configure other entities. After finishing the usage of the multimedia services the user presses the deactivation button to stop a temporary activation. In non-temporary cases the activations are changed by activating one or more other devices at a later point in time. For instance, back at home the user may prefer to use the PDA for receiving the multimedia news. After switch-on the user simply presses the activation software button on the PDA to either receive the news exclusively or simultaneously on the PDA.
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Figure 11: Activation of UE 2 for directing service termination to UE 2
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A.6  Use case on PNE redirection of terminating servicesWord‑p. 22
An advanced user does not only possess a number of different devices with 3GPP access for various purposes like a multimedia phone with advanced camera and music capabilities, a car phone with car specific features, or a smart phone with messaging and internet. The advanced user is interested in local connectivity between these devices and with other owned devices like a PDA and notebook. For instance, a user may be on a business tour with the car. The car has an in-built car phone. The user wants to utilize the 3GPP access of the car phone in order to terminate network services with the notebook. For this purpose the user sets up a local network between notebook and car phone. In this scenario the car phone provides the MT capabilities and the notebook acts as TE of the UE. With the PN UE redirection the user would only be able to redirect terminating services to the car UE. The TE device would not be known and visible to the PLMN routing. The user would have to configure the local network to achieve the proper forwarding and processing within the local network. Instead of complicated manual settings the user wants a simple natural method as provided by the PN UE Redirecting application. The user starts the notebook. Automatically the car phone is detected and a local connection with the car phone is established. Afterwards the user presses a software button for terminating all or selected services on the notebook. This should work independently of the radio access means available for the access to the 3GPP system. For example the notebook may have own radio access means. After activation of the notebook for service termination the radio access means do not matter. Independent of the radio access technology and possibly simultaneous connections to the 3GPP system the chosen services are always directed to the notebook.
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Figure 12: Activating a particular device of a UE or PAN for service termination
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A.7  Use case: Selective update based on capability listsWord‑p. 23
Alice has a home PAN or UE where her video device (sink) has been registered as a PNE at the PNM. Alice is traveling to her office, and has registered her UE to the PN. For all video services she has chosen her video device as the terminating device, where it can be recorded for future viewing. She has also requested the PN service to update her on PN settings based on the service she is interested in (video devices, audio devices, printing devices, other services). For some reason, her video device (TE) becomes unavailable (Eg: power goes down or switched off by somebody else or network down.etc). The home PAN or UE deactivates this video device (TE) and makes the PN service aware of this deactivation. The PN service then lets Alice know of this event based on the capability list she has chosen.
As an effect, Alice after receiving this update may change her video terminating settings to her own UE.
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A.8  Use case: Combination of two PANs

Figure 13 and Figure 14 describe the PNM functionality on combination of two PANs. When PAN1 and PAN2 are physically close to each other, the user may hope to combine them into one PAN and designate UE1 as the new PAN's UE. The PNM needs to deactivate UE2 and update relative registration information (binding tables and addresses) of UE1 and PNEs in PAN2. The PNEs in PAN2 (ME2 and TE2) may keep or change the original network positions, i.e. the connection to UE2 or UE1 (described as case 1 and case 2). After the combination UE2 and ME2 need to be authorized through UE1 to get access for any new service, and then they can access those services directly.
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Figure 13: Combination of two PANs (case 1)
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Figure 14: Combination of two PANs (case 2)
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A.9  Use case: Separation of PANWord‑p. 25
Figure 15 describes the PNM functionality on separation of PAN. It's very likely to happen that some devices in a PAN move far away and almost out of control, or even they are not so far away but the user wants to separate them into two PANs. In this use case the user want to separate ME2, TE2 and ME3 from the PAN and to form a new PAN (PAN2). The PNM shall designate a UE for PAN2, i.e. activate a ME (ME3) who contains a USIM. The PN shall update registration information of ME3 (UE2), ME2, TE2 and UE1 due to the changes of network positions. And the PNEs in PAN2 including UE2 need to get authorized through the USIM on UE2 for new services provided by PLMN.
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Figure 15: Separation of PAN
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$  Change historyWord‑p. 26

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