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RFC 1941

 
 
 

Frequently Asked Questions for Schools

Part 2 of 3, p. 25 to 50
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7.  Questions About Security and Ethics

7.1  I've heard that there is a lot of objectionable material on the
     Internet.  How do I deal with that problem?

   Because sensational media accounts tend to downplay the educational
   uses of the Internet in favor of the more controversial material
   available, this will almost certainly be an issue raised when you
   discuss getting an Internet connection in your school. Concerned
   educators should learn more about this issue and formulate a strategy
   for resolving problems before they arise. One important point to
   realize early is that students do not accidentally bump into
   objectionable material in the course of most educational
   explorations. Although we are not suggesting that people never run
   across objectionable material by chance, most find this material only
   because they're looking for it.

   At the time of this writing the most important and effective action
   schools can take is to develop clear policies to guide students' use
   of the Internet and establish rules - and consequences for breaking
   them - that govern behavior on the Internet. These policies, called
   Acceptable Use Policies (AUPs), work best when they are in line with
   rules governing other behavior at school. Additionally, schools
   should integrate issues around technology and ethics into the
   curriculum [3]. Schools need to exercise reasonable oversight while
   realizing that it is almost impossible to absolutely guarantee that
   students will not be able to access objectionable material. It may be

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   wise to make this clear to parents and students before a student is
   given access to the Internet. To limit a school's liability, some
   systems obtain signed releases from students and parents stipulating
   that they have read the AUP and that the student agrees to abide by
   it.

   Several commercial software products are available which attempt to
   address the problem of access to objectionable material. They block
   access to controversial sites, look for specific text in email
   messages, or do both. Some can be configured in the home or school
   and some block a preconfigured collection of sites which is
   maintained and configured by the company.

   Some success has been achieved through the use of proxy servers. A
   school hooks up all its computers to a single computer that has full
   Internet access. This computer server then becomes the gateway to the
   Internet for all of the school computers. The server can be
   configured to mask away sites that have objectionable material,
   including Web pages, Gopher and FTP sites, and network news and WAIS
   servers. One further step can be taken by also installing a caching
   server on the gateway machine. A caching server can hold Web pages
   locally after they have been retrieved from other sites. Once a page
   has been loaded into the server it can thereafter be fetched from the
   cache, useful if a set of Web pages needs to be accessed frequently
   from a site that is usually busy.

   Although proxy and caching servers are relatively easy to set up by a
   system administrator, entering all the sites that are objectionable
   and keeping the cache up to date can be time consuming. Also, this
   method does not stop teachers and students from receiving and sending
   objectionable material as email attachments.

   The store-and-forward method is one way to filter information to
   which students are exposed. Usenet News and email (both described in
   Section 5, "Questions About Using Internet Services") are "stored" on
   a computer until the time appointed for that computer to contact the
   next one along the path to the final destination, at which time it is
   "forwarded" along its way. Most computers are set up to process
   outgoing requests at least every 30 minutes. This method requires
   quite a bit of management on the part of humans.

   It is also possible to control the times and opportunities that
   students have to access the Internet and only allow access under
   supervision. Many teachers find that engaging their students in
   meaningful, supervised learning activities operates as an effective
   deterrent to unauthorized Internet exploration.

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   At the time of this writing none of the technical solutions discussed
   above has proven wholly successful in addressing the problem of
   student access to controversial material. However, this area is
   currently the focus of intense development efforts. In the mean time,
   these solutions may be used in combination with clear policies and
   consequences for breaking them to ensure the integrity of the school,
   its students, and its educators. No matter what option or combination
   of options you choose, teaching the ethics of Internet access as a
   matter of course is imperative.

   There are resources for further exploration of the issue of students
   and objectionable material available on the Internet. The National
   Center for Missing and Exploited Children has produced a sensible and
   practical brochure entitled, "Child Safety on the Information
   Highway," written by Los Angeles Times columnist Lawrence J. Magid.
   It is available both online and hardcopy. Another good document,
   "Internet Parental Control Frequently Asked Questions," describes the
   tools available at the time of this writing to help with issues of
   children using the Internet, from guidance by parents to government
   restrictions to rating and filtering systems. It is produced by the
   Voters Telecommunications Watch and is available on the Internet.
   There is also at least one mailing list which you may want to join
   called Children Accessing Controversial Information (CACI). For
   information on all of these, please see Section 8, "Suggested
   Reading," and Section 9, "Resources and Contacts."

7.2  How do we keep our own and other people's computers safe from
     student "hackers"?

   In the language of computer folks, a "hacker" is someone who is
   excellent at understanding and manipulating computer systems. A
   "cracker" is someone who maliciously and/or illegally enters or
   attempts to enter someone else's computer system.

   Computer security is unquestionably important, both in maintaining
   the security of the school's computers and in ensuring the proper
   behavior of the school's students (and others who use the network).
   In this area, not only school policy, but also state and national
   laws may apply. One source of information which you can read to help
   you sort through security issues is the Site Security Handbook (FYI
   8), which suggests to site computer administrators, Network
   Information Centers, Network Operation Centers, and others how to set
   up security policies and directs you to further information. A good
   book available commercially is "Computer Security Basics" by Russell
   and Gangemi. The full reference for these two sources of information
   can be found in Section 8, "Suggested Reading."

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   Your school's AUP (see Question 7.4) should specify the consequences
   for such activity, and it may also be prudent to require a signed
   release from each student stating that he understands these
   consequences and possible legal implications of intentional
   exploitation of computer networks.

   In the unlikely event that someone from outside your school breaks in
   to a computer on your network, you should report the activity to the
   CERT Coordination Center. Contact information for the center can be
   found in Section 9, "Resources and Contacts."

7.3  How do we keep viruses from attacking all of our computers if we
     get connected to the Internet?

   Even if you use the Internet to exchange only data (such as text or
   pictures), virus infection can be a problem. This is because many
   programs today allow data files to include commands which are run
   when the data is loaded. Certainly when you download software
   programs and run them on your own computer you should use caution.
   Anything you download over the Internet or an electronic bulletin
   board system could have a virus. For that matter, any program and
   even some documents, whether on tape or a disk, including commercial
   software still in its original packaging, might possibly have a
   virus. Therefore there are two precautions you should take. First,
   install virus protection software on all your computers.  Second, use
   only trusted sources from which to download software and files. If
   you are uncertain about whether to download something, ask someone
   first.

   Virus checking software is available free over the Internet via
   Anonymous FTP from the CERT Coordination Center. Your hardware or
   software vendor, your network access provider, your technical support
   resources, or your colleagues on network mailing lists should be able
   to provide more specific information applicable to your site. Contact
   information for the CERT Coordination Center can be found in Section
   9, "Resources and Contacts."

7.4  What are the rules for using the Internet?

   When your Internet connection is established, your access provider
   should acquaint you with their Acceptable Use Policy. This policy
   explains acceptable and unacceptable uses for your connection. For
   example, it is in all cases unacceptable to use the network for
   illegal purposes. It may, in some cases, be unacceptable to use the
   network for commercial purposes.  If such a policy is not mentioned,
   ask for it. All users are expected to know what the acceptable and
   unacceptable uses of their network are.

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   Remember that it is essential to establish a school-wide policy in
   addition to the provider's AUP. A school's AUP is usually more
   restrictive and specific than the one used by the service provider. A
   repository of sample school AUPs can be found on the Armadillo Web
   server, listed in section 9, "Resources and Contacts." As mentioned
   earlier, some school systems have found it worthwhile to make
   Internet access contingent upon a student's signed agreement to abide
   by the school's AUP.

   Beyond your service provider's AUP and the one you create for your
   school, there are no overreaching rules for Internet use. There are,
   however, community standards and conventions that should be observed.
   You can review some generally agreed-upon guidelines at Arlene
   Rinaldi's etiquette page and by reading FYI 28 (RFC 1855),
   "Netiquette Guidelines." See Section 9, "Resources and Contacts," for
   the location of the etiquette page, and Appendix B, "Ways to Get
   RFCs" for instructions on obtaining FYI 28.

8.  Suggested Reading

   Those items marked with an asterisk (*) are available free online.
   For information on retrieving RFCs and FYIs, see Appendix B, "Ways to
   Get RFCs."

   * Connecting to the Future: A Guide For Building a Network
     Infrastructure for Education. NASA IITA, Department of Education
     NCES. 1995. Gopher: quest.arc.nasa.gov/How to Get Connected to and
     How to Use the Internet  (Also available from NASA CORE with
     accompanying video. See NASA Central Operation of Resources for
     Educators in Section 9, "Resources and Contacts.")

   * Conrad, L. B. "Getting US Educators Online"
     http://quest.arc.nasa.gov/online/table.html  (State-by-state
     compilation of Internet service offerings especially for teachers.)

   Cummins, J. and D. Sayers. Brave New Schools: Challenging Cultural
     Illiteracy Through Global Learning Networks. New York: St. Martin's
     Press, 1995.

   Ellsworth, J. H.  Education on the Internet: A Hands-on Book of
     Ideas, Resources, Projects, and Advice. Indianapolis, Indiana:
     Sams Publishing, 1994.

   * Electronic Frontier Foundation. EFF's (Extended) Guide to the
     Internet.
     http://www.eff.org/pub/Net_info/EFF_Net_Guide/netguide.eff
     and from the EFF online archives at ftp.eff.org, gopher.eff.org,
     AOL keyword EFF, CIS EFFSIG forum.

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   Estrada, S. Connecting to the Internet: An O'Reilly Buyer's Guide.
     Sebastopol, California: O'Reilly and Associates, Inc., 1993.

   * FYI 4  "FYI on Questions and Answers: Answers to Commonly asked
     `New Internet User' Questions," Marine, A., J. Reynolds, and
     G. Malkin. (fyi4.txt or rfc1594.txt)

   * FYI 5  "Choosing a Name for Your Computer," Libes, D. (fyi5.txt or
     rfc1178.txt)

   * FYI 8  "Site Security Handbook," Holbrook, J.P. and J.K. Reynolds.
     (fyi8.txt or rfc1244.txt)

   * FYI 18 "Internet Users' Glossary," Malkin, G. and T. LaQuey Parker.
     (fyi18.txt or rfc1392.txt)

   * FYI 20 "What is the Internet?" Krol, E. and E. Hoffman. (fyi20.txt
     or rfc1462.txt)

   * FYI 26 "K-12 Internetworking Guidelines," J. Gargano, D. Wasley.
     November 1994. (fyi26.txt or rfc1709.txt)

   * FYI 28 "Netiquette Guidelines," Hambridge, S. (fyi28.txt or
     rfc1855.txt)

   Giagnocavo, G., et. al. Educator's Internet Companion (with diskette
     and video). Lancaster, Pennsylvania: Wentworth Worldwide Media,
     1995.

   Harris, J. Way of the Ferret: Finding and Using Educational Resources
     on the Internet. Eugene, Oregon: International Society for
     Technology in Education, 1995.

   Krol, E. The Whole Internet User's Guide & Catalog, Second Edition.
     Sebastopol, CA: O'Reilly & Associates, Inc., 1994. (Also available
     in textbook version)

   * National Center for Missing and Exploited Children
     http://www.missingkids.org/information_superhighway.html (Online
     brochure "Child Safety on the Information Highway")
     Also available from
     National Center for Missing and Exploited Children
     2101 Wilson Boulevard
     Suite 550
     Arlington, VA 22201-3052
     1-800-THE-LOST (1-800-843-5678)

   Protheroe, N. and E. Wilson. The Internet Handbook for School Users.

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     Arlington, Virginia: Educational Research Service, 1994.

   * RFC 1480  "The US Domain,"  Cooper, A. and J. Postel. June 1993.
     (rfc1480.txt)
     [This document will also be useful to people not in the United
     States.  See the sites listed under the FYI documents for the
     location nearest you from which to download the file.]

   * Rinaldi, A. "The Net: User Guidelines and Netiquette,"
     http://rs6000.adm.fau.edu/rinaldi/netiquette.html

   * Rogers, A. "Global Literacy in a Gutenberg Culture,"
     http://gsn.org/gsn/article.gutenberg.html

   Russell, D., and G. T. Gangemi, Sr. Computer Security Basics.
     Sebastopol, California: O'Reilly and Associates, 1991.

   * Safdar, S. J. "Internet Parental Control Frequently Asked Questions,"
     Voters Telecommunications Watch, 1995.
     http://www.vtw.org/pubs/ipcfaq, or email vtw@vtw.org and in the
     subject line type "send ipcfaq" without the quotes

   Steen, D.R., M.R. Roddy, D. Sheffield, and M.B. Stout. Teaching with
     the Internet: Putting Teachers Before Technology. Bellevue,
     Washington: Resolution Business Press, Inc., 1995.

9.  Resources and Contacts

   -----------
   CONFERENCES
   -----------

   A list of other conferences, primarily in the United States, can be
   found at http://www.classroom.net/classroom/conf.htm

   NECC and Tel-Ed
      International Society for Technology in Education
      1787 Agate Street
      Eugene, Oregon  97403-1923
      USA
      Phone:  503-346-4414 or 1-800-336-5191
      Fax:    503-346-5890
      Email:  iste@oregon.uoregon.edu
              (CompuServe:  70014,2117)
              (AppleLink:  ISTE)

   See also "Internet Computers" in this section.

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   INET
      Internet Society
      12020 Sunrise Valley Dr.
      Suite 210
      Reston, Virginia  22091
      USA
      Phone:  703-648-9888
      Fax:    703-620-0913
      Email:  isoc@isoc.org

   ---------------------
   ELECTRONIC MAIL LISTS
   ---------------------

   Lists of electronic mail lists which you can search by category can
   be found via the World Wide Web at http://tile.net/listserv, at
   http://k12.cnidr.org:90/lists.html, and at
   http://catalog.com/vivian/interest-group-search.html.

   Classroom Connect mailing list
      To subscribe, send a message to...
      crc-request@wentworth.com
      Leave the Subject field blank and in the first line of the body
      of the message enter...
      subscribe

   CACI (Children Accessing Controversial Information)
      To subscribe, send a message to...
      caci-request@cygnus.com

      Leave the Subject field blank, and in the first line of the body
      of the message enter...
      subscribe

      To post, send a message to...
      caci@cygnus.com

   Cosndisc (Consortium for School Networking Discussion List)
      To subscribe, send a message to...
      listproc@list.cren.net

      Leave the Subject field blank, and in the first line of the body
      of the message enter...
      subscribe cosndisc YourFirstName YourLastName

      To post, send a message to...
      cosndisc@list.cren.net

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   Cu-seeme-l (General CU-SeeMe discussion list)
      To subscribe, send a message to...
      listproc@cornell.edu

      Leave the Subject field blank, and in the first line of the body
      of the message enter...
      subscribe cu-seeme-l YourFirstName YourLastName

      To post, send a message to...
      cu-seeme-l@cornell.edu

   Cu-seeme-schools (Discussion about using CU-SeeMe as an instructional
        tool)
      To subscribe, send a message to...
      majordomo@gsn.org

      Leave the Subject field blank, and in the first line of the body
      of the message enter...
      subscribe cu-seeme-schools

      To post, send a message to...
      cu-seeme-schools@gsn.org

   Ednet
      To subscribe, send a message to...
      listproc@lists.umass.edu

      Leave the Subject field blank, and in the first line of the body
      of the message enter...
      subscribe ednet YourFirstName YourLastName

      To post, send a message to...
      ednet@lists.umass.edu

   Edtech (Educational Technology list)
      To subscribe, send a message to...
      listserv@msu.edu

      Leave the Subject field blank, and in the first line of the body
      of the message enter...
      subscribe edtech YourFirstName YourLastName

      To post, send a message to...
      edtech@msu.edu

   European Schools Project (ESP)
      To subscribe, send a message to...
      listproc@educ.uva.nl

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   Leave the Subject field blank, and in the first line of the body
      of the message enter...
      subscribe bbs YourFirstName YourLastName

      To post, send a message to...
      bbs@educ.uva.nl

   Internet School Networking (List for the working group which produced
        this document)
      To subscribe, send a message to...
      listmanager@nasa.gov

      Leave the Subject field blank, and in the first line of the body
      of the message enter...
      subscribe isn-wg (NOTE: Do not add your name)

      To post, send a message to...
      isn-wg@nasa.gov

   Kidsphere
      To subscribe, send a message to...
      kidsphere-request@vms.cis.pitt.edu
      Type any message asking to subscribe.

      To post, send a message to...
      kidsphere@vms.cis.pitt.edu

   KIDLINK (Also KIDS-96, KIDS-97, etc.)
      KIDLINK operates 24 public mailing lists in English, Spanish,
      Portuguese, Japanese, Hebrew, and Scandinavian languages, and
      a private "chat" network for members.

      To learn about KIDLINK projects, subscribe to the news service by
      sending a message to...
      listserv@vm1.nodak.edu

      Leave the Subject field blank, and in the first line of the body
      of the message enter...
      subscribe KIDLINK YourFirstName YourLastName

      To receive a file of general information on KIDLINK, send email to
      the same listserv address, leave the Subject field blank, and in
      the first line of the body of the message enter...
      get kidlink general

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   K12admin (A list for K-12 educators interested in educational
      administration)
      To subscribe, send a message to...
      listserv@listserv.syr.edu

      Leave the Subject field blank, and in the first line of the body
      of the message enter...
      subscribe k12admin YourFirstName YourLastName

      To post, send a message to...
      k12admin@listserv.syr.edu

   LM_NET (A list for school library media specialists worldwide)
      To subscribe, send a message to...
      listserv@listserv.syr.edu

      Leave the Subject field blank, and in the first line of the body
      of the message enter...
      subscribe LM_NET YourFirstName YourLastName

      To post, send a message to...
      LM_NET@listserv.syr.edu

   NOVAE Group: Teachers Networking for the Future (Distribution list --
         not discussion list -- of projects and happenings of interest
         to educators)
      To subscribe, send a message to...
      listserv@idbsu.idbsu.edu

      Leave the Subject field blank, and in the first line of
      the body of the message, enter...
      subscribe novae YourFirstName YourLastName

   UK-schools (for teachers and others interested in the use of the
         Internet in UK schools and for general discussion about
         anything concerning international classroom connections)
      To subscribe, send a message to...
      mailbase@mailbase.ac.uk

      Leave the Subject field blank, and in the first line of the body
      of the message enter...
      join uk-schools YourFirstName YourLastName

      To post, send a message to...
      uk-schools@mailbase.ac.uk

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   WWWedu (the World Wide Web in Education list; pronounced "we do")
      To subscribe, send a message to...
      listproc@educom.unc.edu

      Leave the Subject field blank, and in the first line of
      the body of the message, enter...
      subscribe wwwedu YourFirstName YourLastName

      To post, send a message to...
      wwwedu@educom.unc.edu

   ------------------
   INTERNET COMPUTERS
   ------------------

   Academy One (National Public Telecomputing Network)
      via WWW:
      http://www.nptn.org/cyber.serv/AOneP/index.html

   Armadillo's WWW Server
      via WWW:
      http://riceinfo.rice.edu:80/armadillo/

   BBN National School Network Testbed
      via Gopher:
      copernicus.bbn.com

      via WWW:
      http://copernicus.bbn.com:70/testbed/

   Censorship/Freedom of Speech/Child Safety on the Internet Web page
      via WWW:
      http://www.voicenet.com/~cranmer/censorship.html

   Classroom Connect on the Net
      via WWW:
      http://www.classroom.net/

      via FTP:
      ftp.classroom.net/wentworth/Classroom-Connect/aup-faq.txt (for an
        FAQ document on Acceptable Use Policies)

   Chatback Trust and Chatback International network server
      via WWW:
      http://www.tcns.co.uk/chatback/welcome.html

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   CERT Coordination Center
      via WWW:
      http://www.sei.cmu.edu/SEI/programs/cert/CERT.info.html
      http://www.sei.cmu.edu/technology/trustworthy.html

      via email:
      cert@cert.org

      via FTP: info.cert.org
      cd pub/

   Consortium for School Networking
      via Gopher:
      cosn.org

      via WWW:
      http://cosn.org/

   CU-SeeMe
      via WWW:
      http://cu-seeme.cornell.edu/

   Educational Resources Information Center (ERIC)
      via WWW:
      http://ericir.syr.edu/

      via Gopher:
      ericir.syr.edu

      via telnet:
      telnet bbs.oit.unc.edu
      login: launch
        (Follow directions on screen for registration. At the main menu,
        choose number 4, "Topical Document Search (WAIS)", and move to
        eric-digests.  For help in WAIS, type a question mark.)

      via email:
      askeric@ericir.syr.edu
        (In your message ask for the topic you're interested in. A human
        will answer you.)

   Empire Internet Schoolhouse
      via Gopher:
      nysernet.org (port 3000)

   Electronic Frontier Foundation ("A non-profit civil liberties
      organization working in the public interest to protect privacy,
      free expression, and access to online resources and information.")

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      via WWW:
      http://www.eff.org/

      via email:
      ask@eff.org

      via snailmail, telephone, and fax:
      The Electronic Frontier Foundation
      1550 Bryant Street
      San Francisco CA 94103 USA
      +1 415 668 7171 (voice)
      +1 415 668 7007 (fax)

   EdWeb
      via WWW:
      http://edweb.cnidr.org:90/

   European Schools Project
      via WWW:
      http://www.educ.uva.nl/ESP/

   Foundation Center
      via WWW:
      http://fdncenter.org/

   Geometry Forum
      via WWW:
      http://forum.swarthmore.edu/
      http://forum.swarthmore.edu/~steve/steve/wwwhtml.html ("Learning
        to Use the Web and Create Web Pages")

   Global SchoolNet Foundation
      via WWW:
      http://gsn.org/
      http://gsn.org/gsn/article.connect.levels.html ("Internet
        Connectivity Levels")
      http://gsn.org/gsn/article.design.project.html ("How to Design a
        Successful Project")
      http://gsn.org/gsn/article.gutenberg.html ("Global Literacy in
        a Gutenberg Culture")

   Grants Web
      via WWW:
      http://infoserv.rttonet.psu.edu/gweb.htm

   Hot List of K-12 Internet School Sites (Gleason Sackman, SENDIT)
      via WWW:
      http://www.sendit.nodak.edu/k12/

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   International Education and Research Network (I*EARN)

      via WWW:
      http:// www.iearn.org/iearn/

      via Gopher:
      gopher.iearn.org (port 7008)

      via email:
      iearn@iearn.org

   Internet School Networking (ISN) working group home page (publishers
        of this document)
      via WWW:
      http://spider.lloyd.com/isn/index.html

   International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE)
      via WWW:
      http://isteonline.uoregon.edu/

      via Gopher:
      isteonline.uoregon.edu

   KIDLINK
      via WWW:
      http://www.kidlink.org/

      via Gopher:
      gopher.kidlink.org

   Learning Resource Server, University of Illinois College of Education
      via WWW:
      http://www.ed.uiuc.edu/
      http://www.ed.uiuc.edu/Activity-Structures/ (Judi Harris' Network-
         Based Educational Activity Collection)

      via Gopher:
      gopher.ed.uiuc.edu

   MBONE (Multicast Backbone)
      via WWW:
      http://www.mbone.com/techinfo/

   NASA Jason Project
      via WWW:
      http://seawifs.gsfc.nasa.gov/JASON/JASON_HOME.html

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   NASA Online Educational Resources
      via WWW:
      http://quest.arc.nasa.gov/OER/

   NASA Quest
      via WWW:
      http://quest.arc.nasa.gov/
      http://quest.arc.nasa.gov/essay/essay-index.html ("Networks, Where
         Have You Been All My Life" student essay contest winners)

      via Gopher:
      quest.arc.nasa.gov (port 70)

      via FTP:
      ftp quest.arc.nasa.gov

   NASA Spacelink
      via WWW:
      http://spacelink.msfc.nasa.gov/

      via Gopher:
      spacelink.msfc.nasa.gov

   via telnet:
      telnet spacelink.msfc.nasa.gov
      login: guest

      via FTP:
      ftp spacelink.msfc.nasa.gov

   To find information on the NASA Teacher Resource Center Network,
   choose "Educational Services," then "Teacher Resource Center Network."
   For television schedules, follow the menu for "Educational Service"
   to nthe menu option, "Technology."

   National Center for Missing and Exploited Children
      via WWW:
      http://www.missingkids.org/
      http://www.missingkids.org/information_superhighway.html (Online
         brochure "Child Safety on the Information Highway)

   National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA)
      via WWW:
      http://www.ncsa.uiuc.edu/SDG/Software/Mosaic/NCSAMosaicHome.html
         (Mosaic Home Page)
      http://www.ncsa.uiuc.edu/General/Internet/WWW/HTMLPrimer.html
         (A Beginner's Guide to HTML)

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      via FTP:
      ftp ftp.ncsa.uiuc.edu (to download the Mosaic WWW browser)

   National Center for Technology Planning
      via Gopher:
      gopher.msstate.edu

   Choose "Resources Maintained at MS State University," then select
   "National Center for Technology Planning."

   National Science Foundation's (United States) Science and Technology
   Information System (STIS)

      via WWW:
      http://stis.nsf.gov/

      via Gopher:
      stis.nsf.gov

      via telnet:
      telnet stis.nsf.gov
      login:  public
      Follow instructions on screen.

   Netscape Communications
      via WWW:
      http://www.netscape.com/

      via FTP:
      ftp ftp.netscape.com

   Netscape's WWW browser can be downloaded from Netscape's FTP sites at
   ftp.netscape.com, ftp2.netscape.com, ftp3.netscape.com...through
   ftp7.netscape.com.

   Office of Educational Research and Improvement (U.S. Department of
   nEducation)

      via WWW:
      http://oeri.ed.gov/

       via Gopher:
       gopher.ed.gov

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   Providers of Commercial Internet Access (for a list of Internet
   Service Providers)

      via WWW:
      http://www.celestin.com/pocia/

   THE LIST (for a list of Internet Service Providers)
      via WWW:
      http://thelist.com

   Voters Telecommunications Watch
      via WWW:
      http://www.vtw.org/
      http://www.vtw.org/pubs/ipcfaq [Internet Parental Control
         Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) by Shabbir J. Safdar]

   World Wide Web Consortium
      via WWW:
      http://www.w3.org/pub/WWW/

      via telnet:
      telnet telnet.w3.org (public access Lynx client. Use "lynx"
         without the quotes if a login is requested.)

   Web66
      via WWW:
      http://web66.coled.umn.edu/
      http://web66.coled.umn.edu/schools.html (International WWW Schools
         Registry)
      http://web66.coled.umn.edu/Cookbook/contents.html (Classroom
         Internet Server Cookbook)

   -----------
   NEWS GROUPS
   -----------

      alt.algebra.help
      alt.comp.shareware.for-kids
      alt.education.distance
      alt.kids-talk
      bit.listserv.edtech
      comp.security.announce
      k12.chat.elementary
      k12.chat.junior
      k12.chat.senior
      k12.chat.teacher
      k12.ed.art
      k12.ed.business

Top      Up      ToC       Page 43 
      k12.ed.comp.literacy
      k12.ed.health-pe
      k12.ed.life-skills
      k12.ed.math
      k12.ed.music
      k12.ed.science
      k12.ed.soc-studies
      k12.ed.special
      k12.ed.tag
      k12.ed.tech
      k12.edu.life-skills (especially for school counselors)
      k12.euro.teachers (in Europe)
      k12.lang.art
      k12.lang.deutsch-eng
      k12.lang.esp-eng
      k12.lang.francais
      k12.lang.russian
      k12.library
      k12.news
      k12.sys.projects
      misc.education
      misc.education.language.english
      misc.education.multimedia
      misc.kids
      misc.kids.computer
      news.announce.newusers
      uk.education.misc
      uk.education.teachers

   ------------------------
   NEWSLETTERS and JOURNALS
   ------------------------

   Classroom Connect

      Published monthly during the school year, a subscription currently
      costs U.S. $39.00.

      Wentworth Worldwide Media
      1866 Colonial Village Lane
      P.O. Box 10488
      Lancaster, PA 17605-0488
      USA
      Phone:  1-717-393-1000
              1-800-638-1639
      Fax:    1-717-390-4378
      Email:  connect@wentworth.com

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      via WWW:
      http://www.wentworth.com/classroom/crcpub.htm (Classroom Connect
         homen page)
      http://www.wentworth.com/classroom/orderform.htm (order form for
         Classroom Connect Newsletter, books, software, and videos about
         the Internet for educators)

   Electronic Learning

      Published eight times per year, a current subscription to this
      magazine for technology and school change costs $23.95.

      Scholastic, Inc.
      2931 East McCarty Street
      P.O. Box 3710
      Jefferson City, MO  65102-3710

   Learning and Leading with Technology (Formerly "The Computing
   Teacher")

      Published monthly, the current U.S. $61.00 ISTE membership fee
      includes $36.00 for this journal.

      ISTE (International Society for Technology in Education)
      1787 Agate Street
      Eugene, OR  97403
      Phone:  1-503-346-4414

   MultiMedia Schools

      Published five times a year, a subscription currently costs
      U.S. $38.00.

      Online, Inc.
      462 Danbury Road
      Wilton, CT  06897-2126
      USA
      Phone:  1-800-222-3766

   NetTeach News

      Published ten times a year, subscription prices are as follows.

      Annual hardcopy subscription cost:
      U.S. $38.00  for individual subscriptions in the U.S.
      U.S. $45.00  for individual subscriptions in Canada and Mexico
      U.S. $60.00  for individual subscriptions outside North America

Top      Up      ToC       Page 45 
      Annual ASCII electronic copy cost:
      U.S. $22.00  for individual subscriptions worldwide

      Site licenses are available for the electronic version.
      Discounts are available for ten or more orders of the printed
      version for educational institutions.

      For subscription questions and submissions contact:

      Kathleen M. Rutkowski, Editor
      Chaos Publications
      13102 Weather Vane Way
      Herndon, VA  22071
      USA
      Phone:  1-703-471-0593
      Fax:    1-703-471-0596
      Email:  netteach@chaos.com

      via WWW:
      http://www.chaos.com/netteach

   -------------
   ORGANIZATIONS
   -------------

   Asia Pacific Network Information Center
      c/o The United Nations University
      53-70 Jingumae 5-Chome
      Shibuya-ku, Tokyo 150
      Japan
      Phone:  +81-3-5467-7014
      Fax:    +81-3-5467-7015
      Email:  hostmaster@apnic.net
      WWW:    http://www.apnic.net

   AskERIC Project
      ERIC Clearinghouse on Information Resources
      Syracuse University
      4-194 Center for Science & Technology
      Syracuse, New York 13244-4100
      Phone:  315-443-3640
      Fax:    315-443-5448
      Email:  AskERIC@ericir.syr.edu

   See also "Internet Computers" above.

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   CERT Coordination Center (Formerly CERT, Computer Emergency Response
   Team)
      Software Engineering Institute
      Carnegie Mellon University
      Pittsburgh, PA 15313-3890
      USA
      Phone:  412-268-7090
      Fax:    412-268-6989
      Email:  cert@cert.org

   See also "Internet Computers" above.

   Chatback International
      Dr. R. Zenhausern, Executive Director
      Psychology Department
      St. Johns University
      SB 15, Marillac
      Jamaica, NY  11439
      USA
      Phone:  718-990-6447
      Fax:    718-990-6705
      Email:  drz@sjuvm.stjohns.edu

   The Chatback Trust
      Tom Holloway, UK Director
      6 St. Mary's Crescent
      Royal Leamington Spa
      Warwickshire, 1JL
      Phone:  +44-926-888333
      Fax:    +44-926-420204
      Email:  t.holloway@warwick.ac.uk

   See also "Internet Computers" above.

   Consortium for School Networking
      P.O. Box 65193
      Washington, DC  20035-5193
      USA
      Phone:  202-466-6296
      Fax:    202-872-4318
      Email:  info@cosn.org

   See also "Internet Computers" above.

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   European Schools Project ("...a support system for secondary schools
         to explore applications of educational telematics.")
      University of Amsterdam
      Centre for Tele-Learning
      Wibautstraat 4
      1091 GM Amsterdam
      The Netherlands
      Contact: Dr. Pauline Meijer or Dr. Henk Sligte
      Phone:   +31-20-5251248
      Fax:     +31-20-5251211
      Email:   risc@esp.educ.uva.nl
      WWW:     http://www.educ.uva.nl/ESP

   FidoNet
      1151 SW Vermont Street
      Portland, OR 97219
      USA
      Contact: Janet Murray
      Phone:   1-503-280-5280
      Email:   jmurray@psg.com
      WWW: http://bbs.owls.com/~jerrys/fidonet.html (A Fidonet Primer)

   Global SchoolNet Foundation (formerly FrEdMail)
      P.O. Box 243,
      Bonita, CA 91908
      USA
      Phone: (619) 475-4852
      Fax: (619) 472-0735
      Email:  info@gsn.org

   See also "Internet Computers" above.

   International Education and Research Network (I*EARN)
      c/o Copen Family Fund
      345 Kear Street
      Yorktown Heights, NY 10598
      USA
      Contact: Dr. Edwin H. Gragert
      Phone:   914-962-5864
      Fax:     914-962-6472
      Email: iearn@iearn.org

   See also "Internet Computers" above.

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   Internet Society
      12020 Sunrise Valley Dr.
      Suite 210
      Reston, Virginia  22091
      USA
      Phone:  703-648-9888
      Fax:    703-620-0913
      Email:  isoc@isoc.org
      WWW:    http://www.isoc.org/home.html

   KIDLINK Society
      4815 Saltrod
      Norway
      Phone:   +47-370-31204
      Fax:     +47-370-27111
      Email:   kidlink-info@kidlink.org

   See also "Internet Computers" and "Electronic Mail Lists" above.

   K12Net
      1151 SW Vermont Street
      Portland, OR 97219
      USA
      Phone:   503-280-5280
      Contact: Janet Murray
      Email:   jmurray@psg.com
      Gopher:  gopher.psg.com
      WWW:     http://arlo.wilsonhs.pps.k12.or.us/k12.html

   Reseaux IP Europeens Network Coordination Centre (RIPE NCC)
      Kruislaan 409
      NL-1098 SJ  Amsterdam
      The Netherlands
      Phone: +31 20 592 5065
      Fax:   +31 20 592 5090
      Email: ncc@ripe.net
      WWW: http://www.ripe.net/ripe/default.html

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   ------
   VIDEOS
   ------

   Master Communications Group
      7322 Ohms Lane
      Minneapolis, MN  55439
      Phone:  1-800-862-6164
      Fax:    1-612-835-9573

   Titles:
      Experience the Power: Network Technology for Education (produced
        by the National Center for Education Statistics)
      Future Schools: Connected to the World (produced by MIT)

   NASA Central Operation of Resources for Educators (CORE)
      Lorain County Joint Vocational School
      15181 Route 58 South
      Oberlin, OH  44074
      USA
      Phone:   1-216-774-1051, x293/294
      Fax:     1-216-774-2144
      Email: video-info@quest.arc.nasa.gov

   Titles:
      Global Quest: The Internet in the Classroom
      Connecting to the Future: A Guide for Building a Network
         Infrastructure for Education
      Global Quest II: The Internet in the Curriculum
      Others

   The fee for the videos is cost plus shipping and handling.  You may
   also make a copy yourself by taking a blank copy to the nearest NASA
   Teacher Resource Center. For information on the NASA Teacher Resource
   Center Network or on NASA Select, contact your nearest NASA facility
   or consult NASA Spacelink, listed above in "Internet Computers."

Top      Up      ToC       Page 50 
   Wentworth Worldwide Media
      1866 Colonial Village Lane
      P.O. Box 10488
      Lancaster, PA 17605-0488
      USA
      Phone:  1-717-393-1000
              1-800-638-1639
      Fax:    1-717-390-4378

   Titles:
      The Amazing Internet
      Internet Email
      Searching the Internet
      Discovering the World Wide Web
      Others



(page 50 continued on part 3)

Next RFC Part