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Content for  TS 36.305  Word version:  16.2.0

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5  E-UTRAN UE Positioning ArchitectureWord‑p. 17

Figure 5-1 shows the architecture in EPS applicable to positioning of a UE with E-UTRAN access.
The MME receives a request for some location service associated with a particular target UE from another entity (e.g., GMLC or UE) or the MME itself decides to initiate some location service on behalf of a particular target UE (e.g., for an IMS emergency call from the UE) as described in TS 23.271. The MME then sends a location services request to an E-SMLC. The E-SMLC processes the location services request which may include transferring assistance data to the target UE to assist with UE-based and/or UE-assisted positioning and/or may include positioning of the target UE. For the Uplink method, the E-SMLC processes the location services request which includes transferring configuration data to the selected LMU(s). The E-SMLC then returns the result of the location service back to the MME (e.g., a position estimate for the UE and/or an indication of any assistance data transferred to the UE). In the case of a location service requested by an entity other than the MME (e.g., UE or E-SMLC), the MME returns the location service result to this entity.
The SLP is the SUPL entity responsible for positioning over the user plane. Further details of the relationship of the user-plane positioning entities to the E-UTRAN control-plane positioning architecture are described in Annex B.
An eNodeB may control several TPs, such as remote radio heads, or PRS-only TPs for support of PRS-based TBS.
(not reproduced yet)
Figure 5-1: UE Positioning Architecture applicable to E-UTRAN
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5.1  UE Positioning Operations

To support positioning of a target UE and delivery of location assistance data to a UE with E-UTRAN access in EPS, location related functions are distributed as shown in the architecture in Figure 5-1 and as clarified in greater detail in TS 23.271. The overall sequence of events applicable to the UE, E-UTRAN and E-SMLC for any location service is shown in Figure 5.1-1.
Note that when the MME receives Location Service Request in case of the UE is in ECM-IDLE state, the MME performs a network triggered service request as defined in TS 23.401 in order to establish a signalling connection with the UE and assign a specific eNodeB. The UE is assumed to be in connected mode before the beginning of the flow shown in the Figure 5.1-1; that is, any signalling that might be required to bring the UE to connected mode prior to step 1a is not shown. The signaling connection may, however, be later released (e.g. by the eNode B as a result of signaling and data inactivity) while positioning is still ongoing.
(not reproduced yet)
Figure 5.1-1: Location Service Support by E-UTRAN
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Step 1a.
Either: the UE requests some location service (e.g. positioning or delivery of assistance data) to the serving MME at the NAS level.
Step 1b.
Or: some entity in the EPC (e.g. GMLC) requests some location service (e.g. positioning) for a target UE to the serving MME .
Step 1c.
Or: the serving MME for a target UE determines the need for some location service (e.g. to locate the UE for an emergency call).
Step 2.
The MME transfers the location service request to an E-SMLC.
Step 3a.
The E-SMLC instigates location procedures with the serving eNode B for the UE - e.g. to obtain positioning measurements or assistance data.
Step 3b.
In addition to step 3a or instead of step 3a, for downlink positioning the E-SMLC instigates location procedures with the UE - e.g. to obtain a location estimate or positioning measurements or to transfer location assistance data to the UE.
Step 3c.
For uplink positioning (e.g., UTDOA), in addition to performing step 3a, the E-SMLC instigates location procedures with multiple LMUs for the target UE - e.g. to obtain positioning measurements.
Step 4.
The E-SMLC provides a location service response to the MME and includes any needed results - e.g. success or failure indication and, if requested and obtained, a location estimate for the UE.
Step 5a.
If step 1a was performed, the MME returns a location service response to the UE and includes any needed results - e.g. a location estimate for the UE.
Step 5b.
If step 1b was performed, the MME returns a location service response to the EPC entity in step 1b and includes any needed results - e.g. a location estimate for the UE.
Step 5c.
If step 1c occurred, the MME uses the location service response received in step 4 to assist the service that triggered this in step 1c (e.g. may provide a location estimate associated with an emergency call to a GMLC).
Location procedures applicable to E-UTRAN occur in steps 3a, 3b and 3c in Figure 5.1-2 and are defined in greater detail in this specification. Steps 1a and 5a are also applicable to E-UTRAN support because of a capability to tunnel signalling applicable to steps 3a and 3b. Other steps in Figure 5.1-2 are applicable only to the EPC and are described in greater detail and in TS 23.271.
Steps 3a and 3b can involve the use of different position methods to obtain location related measurements for a target UE and from these compute a location estimate and possibly additional information like velocity. Positioning methods supported in this release are summarized in clause 4.3 and described in detail in clause 8.
The case that the eNode B functions as an LCS client is not supported in this version of the specification.
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5.2  E-UTRAN Positioning OperationsWord‑p. 19

Separately from location service support for particular UEs, an E-SMLC may interact with elements in the E-UTRAN in order to obtain measurement information to help assist one or more position methods for all UEs. An E-SMLC may also interact with elements in E-UTRAN to provide location assistance data information for broadcasting.

5.2.1  Downlink Position Method Support

An E-SMLC can interact with any eNodeB reachable from any of the MMEs with signaling access to the E-SMLC in order to obtain location related information to support the downlink position method, including PRS-based TBS. The information can include timing information for the TP in relation to either absolute GNSS time or timing of other TPs and information about the supported cells and TPs including PRS schedule.
Signalling access between the E-SMLC and eNodeB is via any MME with signalling access to both the E-SMLC and eNodeB.
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5.2.2  Uplink Position Method Support |R11|

An E-SMLC can interact with the Serving eNodeB for the UE in order to retrieve target UE configuration information to support the uplink positioning method. The configuration information may include information required by the LMUs in order to obtain uplink time measurements; see clause 8.5.2. The E-SMLC can indicate to the serving eNodeB the need to direct the UE to transmit SRS signals (up to the maximum SRS bandwidth applicable for the carrier frequency) for uplink positioning. If the requested resources are not available, the eNB may assign other resources (or no resources e.g. if none are available) and report the resource allocation to the E-SMLC.
The E-SMLC can also request multiple LMUs to perform uplink time measurements and report the results.
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5.2.3  Assistance Information Broadcast Support |R15|

An E-SMLC can interact with any eNodeB reachable from any of the MMEs with signalling access to the E-SMLC in order to provide location assistance data information for broadcasting. The information can include positioning System Information Blocks (posSIBs) together with assistance information meta data and broadcast periodicity.
Signalling access between the E-SMLC and eNodeB is via any MME with signalling access to both the E-SMLC and eNodeB.

5.3  Functional Description of Elements Related to UE Positioning in E-UTRAN

5.3.1  User Equipment (UE)

The UE may transmit the needed signals for uplink-based UE Positioning measurements and may make measurements of downlink signals from E-UTRAN and other sources such as different GNSS and TBS systems, WLAN access points, Bluetooth beacons, UE barometric pressure and motion sensors. The measurements to be made will be determined by the chosen positioning method.
The UE may also contain LCS applications, or access an LCS application either through communication with a network accessed by the UE or through another application residing in the UE. This LCS application may include the needed measurement and calculation functions to determine the UE's position with or without network assistance. This is outside of the scope of this specification.
The UE may also, for example, contain an independent positioning function (e.g., GPS) and thus be able to report its position, independent of the E-UTRAN transmissions. The UE with an independent positioning function may also make use of assistance information obtained from the network.
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5.3.2  eNode BWord‑p. 20

The eNode B is a network element of E-UTRAN that may provide measurement results for position estimation and makes measurements of radio signals for a target UE and communicates these measurements to an E-SMLC.
The eNode B makes its measurements in response to requests from the E-SMLC (on demand or periodically).
The eNode B may configure the target UE to transmit periodic SRS with multiple transmissions (see 5.2.2) during uplink positioning.
An eNode B may serve several TPs, including for example remote radio heads and PRS-only TPs for PRS-based TBS positioning.
An eNode B may broadcast location assistance data information, received from an E-SMLC, in positioning System Information messages.
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5.3.3  Evolved Serving Mobile Location Centre (E-SMLC)

The E-SMLC manages the support of different location services for target UEs, including positioning of UEs and delivery of assistance data to UEs. The E-SMLC may interact with the serving eNode B for a target UE in order to obtain position measurements for the UE, including uplink measurements made by the eNode B and downlink measurements made by the UE that were provided to the eNode B as part of other functions such as for support of handover. The E-SMLC may also interact with the serving eNode B to indicate to the serving eNode B the need to direct the UE to transmit SRS (see 5.2.2) signals to enable the uplink positioning method and to acquire the target UE configuration data needed by the LMUs to calculate the timing of these signals.
The E-SMLC will select a set of LMUs to be used for the UTDOA positioning. The E-SMLC interacts with the selected LMUs to request timing measurements.
The E-SMLC may interact with a target UE in order to deliver assistance data if requested for a particular location service, or to obtain a location estimate if that was requested.
The E-SMLC may interact with multiple eNode B's to provide location assistance data information for broadcasting. The assistance data information for broadcast may optionally be segmented and/or ciphered by the E-SMLC. The E-SMLC may also interact with MMEs to provide ciphering key data information to the MME as described in greater detail in TS 23.271.
For positioning of a target UE, the E-SMLC decides on the position methods to be used, based on factors that may include the LCS Client type, the required QoS, UE positioning capabilities, and eNode B positioning capabilities. The E-SMLC then invokes these positioning methods in the UE and/or serving eNode B. The positioning methods may yield a location estimate for UE-based position methods and/or positioning measurements for UE-assisted and network-based position methods. The E-SMLC may combine all the received results and determine a single location estimate for the target UE (hybrid positioning). Additional information like accuracy of the location estimate and velocity may also be determined.
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5.3.4  Location Measurement Unit (LMU)

The Location Measurement Unit (LMU) makes measurements and communicates these measurements to an E-SMLC. All positioning measurements obtained by an LMU are supplied to the E-SMLC that made the request.
A UE Positioning request may involve measurements by multiple LMUs.

6  Signalling protocols and interfacesWord‑p. 21

6.1  Network interfaces supporting positioning operations

6.1.1  General LCS control plane architecture

The general LCS control plane architecture in the EPS applicable to a target UE with E-UTRAN access is defined in TS 23.271.

6.1.2  LTE-Uu interface

The LTE-Uu interface, connecting the UE to the eNode B over the air, is used as one of several transport links for the LTE Positioning Protocol.

6.1.3  S1-MME interface

The S1-MME interface between the eNode B and the MME is transparent to all UE-positioning-related procedures. It is involved in these procedures only as a transport link for the LTE Positioning Protocol.
For eNode B related positioning procedures, the S1-MME interface transparently transports both positioning requests from the E-SMLC to the eNode B and positioning results from the eNode B to the E-SMLC.
For delivery of broadcast location assistance data information, the S1-MME interface transparently transports the assistance data information from the E-SMLC to the eNode B for broadcasting and feedback information from the eNode B to the E-SMLC. The S1-MME interface is also used by an MME to provide ciphering keys to UEs for use in deciphering broadcast location assistance data information which was ciphered by an E-SMLC.
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6.1.4  SLs interface

The SLs interface, between the E-SMLC and the MME, is transparent to all UE related and eNode B related positioning procedures. It is then used only as a transport link for the LTE Positioning Protocols LPP and LPPa.
The SLs interface supports location sessions instigated by the MME as defined in TS 23.271. LPP and LPPa transport are then supported as part of any location session.

6.1.5  SLm interface |R11|

The SLm interface between the E-SMLC and an LMU is used for uplink positioning. It is used to transport SLmAP protocol messages over the E-SMLC-LMU interface.
Network sharing should be supported. (Details FFS).

6.2  UE-terminated protocols

6.2.1  LTE Positioning Protocol (LPP)

The LTE Positioning Protocol (LPP) is terminated between a target device (the UE in the control-plane case or SET in the user-plane case) and a positioning server (the E-SMLC in the control-plane case or SLP in the user-plane case). It may use either the control- or user-plane protocols as underlying transport. In this specification, only control plane use of LPP is defined. User plane support of LPP is defined in [17] and [18].
LPP is a point to point positioning protocol with capabilities similar to those in UMTS RRC (TS 25.331) and GERAN RRLP (TS 44.031). Whereas RRLP supports positioning of a target MS accessing GERAN and RRC supports positioning of a target UE accessing UTRAN, LPP supports positioning and location related services (e.g. transfer of assistance data) for a target UE accessing E-UTRAN. To avoid creating new positioning protocols for future access types developed by 3GPP, and to enable positioning measurements for terrestrial access types other than E UTRAN, LPP is in principle forward-compatible with other access types, even though restricted to E-UTRAN access in this specification.
LPP further supports the OMA user plane location solution SUPL 2.0, as defined in the OMA SUPL 2.0 standards ([17], [18]), and is intended to be compatible with the successor protocols of SUPL 2.0 as well.
LPP messages are carried as transparent PDUs across intermediate network interfaces using the appropriate protocols (e.g., S1-AP over the S1-MME interface, NAS/RRC over the Uu interface). The LPP protocol is intended to enable positioning for LTE using a multiplicity of different position methods, while isolating the details of any particular positioning method and the specifics of the underlying transport from one another.
The protocol operates on a transaction basis between a target device and a server, with each transaction taking place as an independent procedure. More than one such procedure may be in progress at any given moment. An LPP procedure may involve a request/response pairing of messages or one or more "unsolicited" messages. Each procedure has a single objective (e.g., transfer of assistance data, exchange of LPP related capabilities, or positioning of a target device according to some QoS and use of one or more positioning methods). Multiple procedures, in series and/or in parallel, can be used to achieve more complex objectives (e.g., positioning of a target device in association with transfer of assistance data and exchange of LPP related capabilities). Multiple procedures also enable more than one positioning attempt to be ongoing at the same time (e.g., to obtain a coarse location estimate with low delay while a more accurate location estimate is being obtained with higher delay).
An LPP session is defined between a positioning server and the target device, the details of its relation with transactions are described in clause 4.1.2 of TS 36.355.
A single LPP transaction may be realised as multiple procedures; e.g., a single transaction for provision of assistance data might comprise several Provide Assistance Data messages, with each such message constituting a separate procedure (since there is no "multiple unsolicited messages" procedure type).
For the 3GPP EPS Control Plane solution defined in TS 23.271, the UE is the target device and the E-SMLC is the server. For SUPL 2.0 support, the SUPL Enabled Terminal (SET) is the target device and the SUPL Location Platform (SLP) is the server. The protocol does not preclude the possibility of future developments in control plane and user plane solutions (e.g., possible successors of SUPL 2.0, as well as possible future 3GPP control plane solutions).
All LPP operations and procedures are defined with respect to the target and server, and thus the LPP operations and procedures defined here with respect to a UE and an E-SMLC can also be viewed in this more generic context by substituting any target for the UE and any server for the E-SMLC.
LPP further supports multiple positioning methods as defined in clause 4.3.
LPP supports hybrid positioning, in which two or more position methods are used concurrently to provide measurements and/or a location estimate or estimates to the server. LPP is forward compatible with the later addition of other position methods in later releases (e.g., position methods associated with other types of terrestrial access).
LPP also supports RRC broadcast of location assistance data information using data types defined in relation to LPP which are embedded in positioning SIBs. This enables an E-SMLC and a UE to support broadcast location assistance data using the same data structures which are used for point to point location.
The operations controlled through LPP are described further in clause 7.1.
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6.2.2  Radio Resource Control (RRC)Word‑p. 22

The RRC protocol is terminated between the eNode B and the UE. In addition to providing transport for LPP messages over the Uu interface, it supports transfer of measurements that may be used for positioning purposes through the existing measurement systems specified in TS 36.331.
The RRC protocol also supports broadcasting of location assistance data via positioning System Information messages.

6.3  eNB-terminated protocolsWord‑p. 23

6.3.1  LTE Positioning Protocol Annex (LPPa)

The LTE Positioning Protocol Annex (LPPa) carries information between the eNode B and the E-SMLC. It is used to support the following positioning functions:
  • E-CID cases where assistance data or measurements are transferred from the eNode B to the E-SMLC;
  • data collection from eNodeBs for support of downlink OTDOA positioning;
  • retrieval of UE configuration data from the eNodeBs for support of uplink (e.g., UTDOA) positioning;
  • exchange of information between E-SMLC and eNodeBs for the purpose of assistance data broadcasting.
The LPPa protocol is transparent to the MME. The MME routes the LPPa PDUs transparently based on a short Routing ID corresponding to the involved E-SMLC node over S1 interface without knowledge of the involved LPPa transaction. It carries the LPPa PDUs over S1 interface either in UE associated mode or non-UE associated mode.
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6.3.2  S1 Application Protocol (S1-AP)

The S1-AP protocol, terminated between the MME and the eNode B, is used as transport for LPP and LPPa messages over the S1-MME interface. The S1-AP protocol is also used to instigate and terminate eNode B related positioning procedures.

6.4  Signalling between an E-SMLC and UE

6.4.1  Protocol Layering

Figure 6.4.1-1 shows the protocol layering used to support transfer of LPP messages between an E-SMLC and UE. The LPP PDU is carried in NAS PDU between the MME and the UE.
(not reproduced yet)
Figure 6.4.1-1: Protocol Layering for E-SMLC to UE Signalling
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6.4.2  LPP PDU Transfer

Figure 6.4.2-1 shows the transfer of an LPP PDU between an E-SMLC and UE, in the network- and UE-triggered cases. These two cases may occur separately or as parts of a single more complex operation.
(not reproduced yet)
Figure 6.4.2-1: LPP PDU transfer between E-SMLC and UE (network- and UE-triggered cases)
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Step 1.
Steps 1 to 4 may occur before, after, or at the same time as steps 5 to 8. Steps 1 to 4 and steps 5 to 8 may also be repeated. Steps 1 to 4 are triggered when the E-SMLC needs to send an LPP message to the UE as part of some LPP positioning activity. The E-SMLC then sends an LCS-AP PDU to the MME carrying an LPP PDU comprising the message.
Step 2.
If the UE is in ECM-IDLE state (e.g. if the S1 connection was previously released due to data and signalling inactivity), the MME performs a network triggered service request as defined in TS 23.401 in order to establish a signalling connection with the UE and assign a serving eNode B.
Step 3.
The MME includes a session identifier (a.k.a Routing identifier defined in TS 24.171), which is associated with the positioning session between the MME and E-SMLC, and the LPP PDU in the NAS Transport Message and then forwards the NAS Transport Message to the serving eNode B in an S1AP Downlink NAS Transport message. The MME need not retain state information for this transfer; it can treat any response in step 7 as a separate non-associated transfer.
Step 4.
The eNode B forwards the NAS Transport Message to the UE in an RRC DL Information Transfer message.
Step 5.
Steps 5 to 8 are triggered when the UE needs to send an LPP PDU to the E-SMLC as part of some LPP positioning activity. If the UE is in ECM-IDLE state, the UE instigates a UE triggered service request as defined in TS 23.401 in order to establish a signalling connection with the MME and assign a serving eNode B.
Step 6.
The UE includes the session identifier (a.k.a Routing identifier defined in TS 24.171), which has been received in step 4, and an LPP PDU to the serving eNode B in an RRC UL Information Transfer message.
Step 7.
The eNode B forwards the NAS Transport Message to the MME in an S1AP Uplink NAS Transport message.
Step 8.
The MME forwards the LPP PDU to the E-SMLC in an LCS-AP PDU.
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6.5  Signalling between an E-SMLC and eNode BWord‑p. 24

6.5.1  Protocol Layering

Figure 6.5.1-1 shows the protocol layering used to support transfer of LPPa PDUs between an E-SMLC and eNode B.
The LPPa protocol is transparent to the MME. The MME routes the LPPa PDUs transparently based on a short Routing ID which corresponds to the involved E-SMLC node over the S1 interface without knowledge of the involved LPPa transaction. It carries the LPPa PDUs over S1 interface either in UE associated mode or non-UE associated mode.
(not reproduced yet)
Figure 6.5.1-1: Protocol Layering for E-SMLC to eNode B Signalling
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6.5.2  LPPa PDU Transfer for UE PositioningWord‑p. 25

Figure 6.5.2-1 shows LPPa PDU transfer between an E-SMLC and eNode B to support positioning of a particular UE.
(not reproduced yet)
Figure 6.5.2-1: LPPa PDU Transfer between an E-SMLC and eNode B for UE Positioning
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Step 1.
Steps 1 to 3 are triggered when the E-SMLC needs to send an LPPa message to the serving eNode B for a target UE as part of an LPPa positioning activity. The E-SMLC then sends an LCS-AP PDU (as specified in TS 29.171) to the MME including the Correlation ID corresponding to the UE and carrying an LPPa PDU comprising the message.
Step 2.
If the UE is in ECM-IDLE state (e.g. if the S1 connection was previously released due to data and signalling inactivity), the MME performs a network triggered service request as defined in TS 23.401 in order to establish a signalling connection with the UE and assign a serving eNode B.
Step 3.
The MME forwards the LPPa PDU to the serving eNode B in an S1AP Downlink UE Associated LPPa Transport message over the S1 signalling connection corresponding to the UE and includes the Routing ID related to the E-SMLC. The MME need not retain state information for this transfer - e.g. can treat any response in step 4 as a separate non-associated transfer.
Step 4.
Steps 4 and 5 are triggered when a serving eNode B needs to send an LPPa message to the E-SMLC for a target UE as part of an LPPa positioning activity. The eNode B then sends an LPPa PDU to the MME in an S1AP Uplink UE Associated LPPa Transport message and includes the Routing ID received in step 3.
Step 5.
The MME forwards the LPPa PDU to the E-SMLC associated with the Routing ID received in step 4 in an LCS-AP PDU (as specified in TS 29.171) including the Correlation ID corresponding to the UE. Steps 1 to 5 may be repeated.
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6.5.3  LPPa PDU Transfer for Positioning SupportWord‑p. 26

Figure 6.5.3-1 shows LPPa PDU transfer between an E-SMLC and eNodeB when related to gathering data from the eNodeB for positioning support for all UEs.
(not reproduced yet)
Figure 6.5.3-1: LPPa PDU Transfer between an E-SMLC and eNodeB for obtaining eNodeB Data
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Step 0.
An eNodeB may communicate with several TPs (including PRS-only TPs in case of PRS-based TBS is supported) to configure TPs, obtain TP configuration information, etc.
Step 1.
Steps 1 and 2 are triggered when the E-SMLC needs to send an LPPa message to an eNodeB to obtain data related to the eNodeB, and possibly associated TPs. The E-SMLC determines an MME with access to the eNodeB and then sends an LCS-AP PDU (as specified in TS 29.171) to the MME carrying an LPPa PDU, the global identity of the eNodeB and the identity of the E-SMLC.
Step 2.
The MME forwards the LPPa PDU to the identified eNode B in an S1AP Downlink Non UE Associated LPPa Transport message and includes the Routing ID related to the E-SMLC. The MME need not retain state information for this transfer - e.g. can treat any response in step 3 as a separate non-associated transfer.
Step 3.
Steps 3 and 4 are triggered when an eNode B needs to send an LPPa PDU to an E-SMLC containing data applicable to the eNodeB, and possibly associated TPs. The eNodeB determines an MME with access to the E-SMLC and then sends an LPPa PDU to the MME in an S1AP Uplink Non UE Associated LPPa Transport message. The eNodeB includes the Routing ID related to the E-SMLC received at step 2.
Step 4.
The MME forwards the LPPa PDU to the E-SMLC associated to the Routing ID indicated in step 3 and includes the global identity of the eNodeB and the identity of the E-SMLC in an LCS-AP PDU (as specified in TS 29.171). Steps 1 to 4 may be repeated.
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6.5.4  LPPa PDU Transfer for Assistance Information Broadcast |R15|

Figure 6.5.4-1 shows LPPa PDU transfer between an E-SMLC and eNode B to support broadcast of assistance data.
(not reproduced yet)
Figure 6.5.4-1: LPPa PDU Transfer between an E-SMLC and eNodeB for providing assistance information for broadcasting.
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Step 1.
Step 1 is triggered when the E-SMLC needs to send new or updated assistance information to an eNodeB for broadcasting in positioning system information messages. The E-SMLC determines an MME with access to the eNodeB and then sends an LCS-AP PDU (as specified in TS 29.171) to the MME carrying an LPPa PDU, the global identity of the eNodeB and the identity of the E-SMLC.
Step 2.
The MME forwards the LPPa PDU to the identified eNode B in an S1AP Downlink Non UE Associated LPPa Transport message and includes the Routing ID related to the E-SMLC. The MME need not retain state information for this transfer.
Figure 6.5.4-2 shows LPPa PDU transfer between an eNode B and E-SMLC for providing feedback to the E-SMLC on assistance data broadcasting.
(not reproduced yet)
Figure 6.5.4-2: LPPa PDU Transfer between an eNodeB and E-SMLC for providing feedback on assistance data broadcasting.
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Step 1.
Step 1 is triggered when an eNode B needs to send an LPPa PDU to an E-SMLC for providing feedback on assistance data broadcasting. Step 1 may only be triggered if the procedure in Figure 6.5.4-1 has already been performed. The eNodeB determines an MME with access to the E-SMLC and then sends an LPPa PDU to the MME in an S1AP Uplink Non UE Associated LPPa Transport message. The eNodeB includes the previously received Routing ID related to the E-SMLC (Figure 6.5.4-1).
Step 2.
The MME forwards the LPPa PDU to the E-SMLC associated to the Routing ID indicated in step 1 and includes the global identity of the eNodeB and the identity of the E-SMLC in an LCS-AP PDU (as specified in TS 29.171).
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6.6  LMU-terminated protocols |R11|Word‑p. 28

6.6.1  SLm Application Protocol (SLmAP)

The SLmAP protocol, terminated between the E-SMLC and the LMU is used to support the following functions:
  • delivery of target UE configuration data from the E-SMLC to the LMU
  • request positioning measurements from the LMU and delivery of positioning measurements to the E-SMLC.
The SLmAP protocol is directly between the E-SMLC and the LMU.

6.7  Signalling between an E-SMLC and LMU |R11|

6.7.1  Protocol Layering

Figure 6.Y.1-1 shows the protocol layering used to support transfer of SLmAP messages between an E-SMLC and LMU.
(not reproduced yet)
Figure 6.7.1-1: Protocol Layering for direct E-SMLC to LMU Signalling
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