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Content for  TR 23.852  Word version:  12.0.0

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1  ScopeWord‑p. 8

This Study item is to study:
  1. The addition of a S2a based on GTP option. In particular this SID will develop the necessary stage 2 message flows to support S2a based on GTP and mobility between GTP-S5/S8 and GTP-S2a.
  2. Supporting WLAN access to EPC through S2a via mechanisms:
    • with no impact to the UE;
    • with impact to the UE.
Solutions requiring modifications to non 3GPP link-layers will not be considered. It is expected that the result of this Study Item may be used by 3GPP-BBF interworking activities (BBAI).
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2  References

The following documents contain provisions which, through reference in this text, constitute provisions of the present document.
  • References are either specific (identified by date of publication, edition number, version number, etc.) or non specific.
  • For a specific reference, subsequent revisions do not apply.
  • For a non-specific reference, the latest version applies. In the case of a reference to a 3GPP document (including a GSM document), a non-specific reference implicitly refers to the latest version of that document in the same Release as the present document.
[1]
TR 21.905: "Vocabulary for 3GPP Specifications".
[2]
TS 41.101: ""Technical Specifications and Technical Reports for a GERAN-based 3GPP system".
[3]
TS 23.402: "Architecture enhancements for non-3GPP accesses".
[4]
TS 23.203: "Policy and charging control architecture".
[5]
IEEE Std 802.11-2007: "IEEE Standard for Information technology - Telecommunications and information exchange between systems - Local and metropolitan area networks - Specific requirements - Part 11: Wireless LAN Medium Access Control (MAC) and Physical Layer (PHY) Specifications".
[6]
TS 23.401: "General Packet Radio Service (GPRS) enhancements for Evolved Universal Terrestrial Radio Access Network (E-UTRAN) access".
[7]
TS 29.273: "Evolved Packet System (EPS); 3GPP EPS AAA interfaces".
[8]
RFC 791:  "Internet Protocol".
[9]
RFC 2131:  "Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol".
[10]
RFC 2460:  "Internet Protocol, Version 6 (IPv6) Specification".
[11]
RFC 4861:  "Neighbor Discovery for IP version 6 (IPv6)".
[12]
RFC 4862:  "IPv6 Stateless Address Autoconfiguration".
[13]
RFC 4436:  "Detecting Network Attachment in IPv4 (DNAv4)".
[14]
RFC 6059:  "Simple Procedures for Detecting Network Attachment in IPv6".
[15]
IEEE Std 802.11n-2009: "IEEE Standard for Information technology - Telecommunications and information exchange between systems - Local and metropolitan area networks - Specific requirements - Part 11: Wireless LAN Medium Access Control (MAC) and Physical Layer (PHY) Specifications. Enhancements for Higher Throughput (Amendment 5)".
[16]
RFC 6085:  " Address Mapping of IPv6 Multicast Packets on Ethernet".
[17]
RFC 5213:  "Proxy Mobile IPv6".
[18]
RFC 5844:  "IPv4 Support for Proxy Mobile IPv6".
[19]
RFC 3736:  "Stateless Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) Service for IPv6".
[20]
IEEE Std 802.1Q-2011: "IEEE Standard for Local and metropolitan area networks--Media Access Control (MAC) Bridges and Virtual Bridged Local Area Networks".
[21]
IEEE Std 802.11u-2011: " IEEE Standard for Information technology - Telecommunications and information exchange between systems - Local and metropolitan area networks - Specific requirements - Part 11: Amendment 9: Interworking with External Networks".
[22]
RFC 4187:  "Extensible Authentication Protocol Method for 3rd Generation Authentication and Key Agreement (EAP-AKA)".
[23]
RFC 3315:  "Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol for IPv6 (DHCPv6)".
[24]
RFC 3203:  "DHCP reconfigure extension".
[25]
RFC 6085:  "Address Mapping of IPv6 Multicast Packets on Ethernet".
[26]
IEEE Std 802-2001: "IEEE Standard for Local and Metropolitan Area Networks: Overview and Architecture".
[27]
RFC 5448:  "Improved Extensible Authentication Protocol Method for 3rd Generation Authentication and Key Agreement (EAP-AKA')".
[28]
TS 33.402: "3GPP System Architecture Evolution (SAE); Security aspects of non-3GPP accesses".
[29]
RFC 6704:  "Forcerenew Nonce Authentication".
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3  Definitions and abbreviationsWord‑p. 9

3.1  Definitions

For the purposes of the present document, the terms and definitions given in TR 21.905 apply.

3.2  Abbreviations

For the purposes of the present document, the abbreviations given in TR 21.905 and the following apply.
An abbreviation defined in the present document takes precedence over the definition of the same abbreviation, if any, in TR 21.905.
ANQP
Access Network Query Protocol
CAPWAP
Control And Provisioning of Wireless Access Points
DHCPv4
Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol for IPv4
DHCPv6
Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol for IPv6
DLNA
Digital Living Network Alliance
DNAv4
Detecting Network Attachment in IPv4
DNAv6
Detecting Network Attachment in IPv6
Femto
Femto is short for femtocell and is synonymous of HNB or HeNB in 3GPP.
FCS
Frame Checksum
GAS
Generic Advertisement Service
IAID
Identity Association Identifier
IPCP
Internet Protocol Control Protocol
IPv6CP
IPv6 Control Protocol
LCP
Link Control Protocol
LLC
Logical Link Control
LL-DAD
Logical Link Duplicate Address Detection
NSWO
Non-seamless WLAN Offload
OUI
Organization Unique Identifier
PPPoE
Point to Point Protocol Over Ethernet
SAP
Service Access Port
SLAAC
Stateless Address Auto-configuration
SNAP
Subnetwork Access Protocol
TNAP
Trusted non-3GPP Access Peers
TNSP
Trusted non-3GPP Signalling Peers
TWAG
Trusted WLAN Access Gateway
TWAP
Trusted Wireless Access Proxy
TWAN
Trusted WLAN AN
VMAC
Virtual MAC
WCS
WLAN Control Signalling
WLCP
WLAN Control Protocol
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4  ScenariosWord‑p. 10

The decision on whether a non 3GPP access is considered trusted or un trusted is made by the HPLMN operator and is not a characteristic of the non 3GPP access network. More details on it are provided in clause 4.3.1.2 of TS 23.402. The HPMN operator however while making a decision on trust worthiness of a non 3GPP access can also take into consideration security aspects of the access network.
WLAN security was considered poor in both strength and ease of use, compared with that taken for granted in 3G networks and devices (UICC plus HSS, and GPRS encryption of data). Hence it made sense for the Mobile Network Operators (MNOs) to use their core network to add overlay security layers, i.e. the IKEv2 for Authentication and Authorization of the UE, and the IPSec between the UE and ePDG for the security of the user data.
Now, with the deployment of 802.1x, 802.11u, 802.11i and Hotspot 2.0, it may be considered by some operators that the security strength and ease of use (discovery and set up) is as acceptable as 3G/LTE security. For example, for the radio air link, the operator controlled hotspot with 802.11i could be treated as a secure Non-3GPP Access. As 802.11i (or WPA2 called by WFA) has been released for several years, many AP-s support it as a basic feature and lots of smart phones also have supported it.
WLAN can also be deployed integrated in a residential/enterprise device (e.g. femto). In such a scenario, protection mechanism for the traffic on the backhaul link between the residential/enterprise device and the EPC may be used. This protection of the backhaul may be leveraged to consider the WLAN security in terms of connectivity to the EPC.
The impact on the support of the following scenarios shall be used to evaluate the solutions that will be proposed in the study:
  • Access to EPC resources/services with access control by the operator;
  • Seamless mobility between 3GPP and WLAN for EPS services with IP address preservation;
  • Non-seamless mobility services between 3GPP and WLAN for EPS services: no IP address preservation;
  • Support of UEs with single PDN connection; support of UEs with multiple PDN connections;
  • Access to EPC via WLAN simultaneously with non-seamless WLAN offload.
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